"For many of these women, the reading experience begins from a place of seething rage. Take Sara Marcus’ initial impression of Jack Kerouac: “I remember putting On the Road down the first time a woman was mentioned. I was just like: ‘Fuck. You.’ I was probably 15 or 16. And over the coming years I realized that it was this canonical work, so I tried to return to it, but every time I was just like, ‘Fuck you.’” Tortorici had a similarly visceral reaction to Charles Bukowski: “I will never forget reading Bukowski’s Post Office and feeling so horrible, the way that the narrator describes the thickness of ugly women’s legs. I think it was the first time I felt like a book that I was trying to identify with rejected me. Though I did absorb it, and of course it made me hate my body or whatever.” Emily Witt turned to masculine texts to access a sexual language that was absent from books about women, but found herself turned off by their take: “many of the great classic coming-of-age novels about the female experience don’t openly discuss sex,” she says in No Regrets. “I read the ones by men instead, until I was like, ‘I cannot read another passage about masturbation. I can’t. It was like a pile of Kleenex.”

This isn’t just about the books. When young women read the hyper-masculine literary canon—what Emily Gould calls the “midcentury misogynists,” staffed with the likes of Roth, Mailer, and Miller—their discomfort is punctuated by the knowledge that their male peers are reading these books, identifying with them, and acting out their perspectives and narratives. These writers are celebrated by the society that we live in, even the one who stabbed his wife. In No Regrets, Elif Bautman talks about reading Henry Miller for the first time because she had a “serious crush” on a guy who said his were “the best books ever,” and that guy’s real-life recommendation exacerbated her distaste for the fictional. When she read Miller, “I felt so alienated by the books, and then thinking about this guy, and it was so hot and summertime … I just wanted to kill myself. … He compared women to soup.”"

In No Regrets, women writers talk about what it was like to read literature’s “midcentury misogynists.” (via becauseiamawoman)

Here’s a fun thing you learn when you study literature: the western canon is not universally beloved. Those books are not the Truth any more than the New York Post is skilled journalism. The main reason they’re held in such high esteem is because they were written by boring white dudes with rage fantasies and boring white dudes with rage fantasies also happen to be largely in charge of deciding which books are deemed classics and taught forever in the American school system.
So if your boyfriend tells you he loves Kerouac then you tell your boyfriend Kerouac was a fucking second rate hack who wrote Beat style because he didn’t have the skill or talent to write any other way, which is probably also why he just copied every adolescent male wanderlust story since the beginning of time. That shit’s derivative and boring.

(via saintthecla)

(via trungles)

Não é fácil mesmo

Não é fácil mesmo

(Source: beesmygod, via voltafr)

(Source: 4GIFs.com, via 4gifs)

fotojournalismus:

Day 10: Israel destroys Gaza’s Wafa hospital as staff evacuates all patientsthree children killed while playing on roof5,000 tonnes of explosives fired at Gaza during Israel’s 10-day assault, UNRWA asked Israel to retract false claims about schoolsIsrael launches Gaza ground operation as death toll passes 240 | July 17, 2014

1. A Palestinian woman cries inside her damaged house which was targeted in an Israeli air strike. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

2. Palestinian children fill bottles and containers with water from a public tap in Rafah. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

3. Belongings are strewn about in a building that police said was damaged by an overnight Israeli air strike in Khan Younis. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

4. A Palestinian girl walks with a toy that she salvaged from debris of the el-Yazje apartment building which was destroyed following an overnight Israeli missile strike. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)

5. Children’s shoes are bagged among belongings salvaged from a damaged Palestinian home which police said was targeted in an Israeli air strike. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

6. A Palestinian boy rides his bicycle past a damaged building following an Israeli air strike. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

7. Flares fired by the Israeli military are seen above the northern Gaza Strip. (Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)

8. The father of two boys from the Shaibar family, whom medics said were killed along with a girl from the same extended family by an Israeli air strike after the end of a five-hour humanitarian ceasefire, grieves outside the morgue in Gaza City. (Finbarr O’Reilly/Reuters)

9. A Palestinian woman reacts inside her damaged house which was targeted in an Israeli air strike in Gaza City. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

10. Smoke from flares rises in the sky in Gaza City, in the northern Gaza Strip. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4 | Naming the dead)

Fazendo fotossíntese

Fazendo fotossíntese

#sunset (em Pico Agudo)

#sunset (em Pico Agudo)

#Sakura #cherryblossom (em Parque Das Cerejeiras)

#Sakura #cherryblossom (em Parque Das Cerejeiras)

"I have been astonished by hearing individuals who inherited wealth in childhood warn against sharing resources because people needing help should work for money in order to appreciate its value. Inherited wealth and/or substantial material resources are rarely talked about in the mass media because those who receive it do not wish to validate the idea that money received that is not a reward for hard work is beneficial. Their acceptance and use of this money to strengthen their economic self-sufficiency exposes the reality that working hard is rarely the means by which enough of us can gain enough access to material resources to become wealthy. One of the ironies of the culture of greed is that the people who profit the most from earnings they have not worked to attain are the most eager to insist that the poor and working classes can only value material resources attained through hard work. Of course, they are merely establishing a belief system that protects their class interests and lessens their accountability to those who are without privilege."
bell hooks in All About Love: New Visions (via ethiopienne)

(Source: vanillaandlavender, via hipocampo)